Archives for category: Uncategorized

I’m passing on this little tid bit of information about a DHI Scholarship (woohoo!). Sadly, I don’t qualify–but hopefully one of you will!Applications are due Oct. 15, 2011!

DHI Scholarship Information

Be sure to read other Progressive Dairy articles for current issues and breakthroughs in the Dairy Industry!

Good luck on the scholarship!

Happy National Ice Cream Month!

Ice cream is my favorite treat! And in honor of ice cream month, here are a few cool tidbits about this tasty dairy product:

  • It takes 12 pounds of whole milk to make one gallon of ice cream.
  • It takes about 50 licks to lick away one scoop of ice cream!
  • Vanilla, chocolate, butter pecan, strawberry, and mint chocolate chip are the most popular ice cream flavors!
  • 5% of ice cream eaters share their ice cream with their pet!
  • Of all the days of the week, most ice cream is bought on Sunday!
  • Kids aged 2-12 and adults over 45 eat the most ice cream!
  • The U.S. enjoys an average of 48 pints of ice cream per person, per year, more than any other country.
  • An average dairy cow can produce enough milk in her lifetime to make a little over 9,000 gallons of ice cream.
  • In the U.S., all ice cream needs to have a minimum of 10% milkfat if it is to be labeled “ice cream”. This includes custard based (French Style) ice creams.
  • There is actually an ice cream diet designed for weight loss.

             Click here to read about the Ice Cream Weight Loss Diet!

Plows and Cows is on Facebook!


Plows and Cows is on Facebook!


… and this is where I’m ‘gonna stay (for at least a year).

I got back to God’s Country yesterday afternoon. It is so nice to see trees again–ok ok, and I guess it’s nice to see my parents and dog, too. The first thing I noticed when I stepped out of the car was the incredible humidity. Holy Moly. I felt like I was melting. Now, let me assure you that I was born and raised in this crazy humidity, but being in New Mexico-I got SPOILED. It’s hot there, but it doesn’t feel nearly as bad as it does here. I feel like I am literally dripping sweat as soon as I walk outside in this east central Texas heat. Geez!

As many of you know, I went to Ruidoso after the dairy program. It was super fun, and a great experience. New Mexico’s mountains are simply beautiful. I loved being there. It was a nice get-away and we all had a blast ripping and running around Ruidoso and the surrounding areas. I think my favorite part of the trip was the drive from Cloudcroft to Alamogordo. It was amazing. The canyons there were breath-taking. You could see for MILES. It’s always nice to see God’s handywork at it’s finest. 🙂

…So–SURPRISE! Guess what! I get to go pick up my 4 jersey heifer calves this week!!! I cannot wait–I’m chomping at the bits to get these little girls! Next year, when I graduate, they’ll be ready to breed, and by the next year I’ll have some new little jersey calves running around. EEEK!

It’s so good to be home… but it’s back to reality soon at work and school. 

XOXO Y’all!

Yesterday, a couple of van loads (including me) got up super early at the crack of dawn to go to Lubbock Feed Lot. Gross huh? I hate Lubbock. The roads are crazy, and lets just face it… it’s home of the Red Raiders and I’d rather not associate with such.
The feed lot was pretty standard, I believe. Lots of heifers and steers ranging from probably 500-600 pounds to 1300 pounds. What surprised me the most was that a good bit of the cattle there were from Mexico. The man giving us the tour told us that Mexican cattle generally fed out better (and they made more return off of them). Because of the laws though, they have to keep them separate on the feed lot AND in slaughter. There were thousands of Mexican cattle branded with either an “M” or an “MX” on their right hip (MX for heifer).
Tito, our guide, also told us that with the future food shortages, the grading system for beef will probably change (and that’s a great thing for cattle producers). No longer will cattle be graded and given a premium for Prime and Choice beef, but it will be on a red meat basis. The government will want producers to make more RED MEAT on the same land area. And there are not a lot of ways this can be done.
Fact — Did you know that to produce a prime or choice steer, the last 250(ish) pounds are the MOST expensive? Do you know why? Because all that the feed is adding to the steer is fat. Usually back fat, and as we have learned in school–back fat and marbling are not very correlated. So basically feed lots are paying way too much for the last few hundred pounds of FAT. As someone who likes MINIMAL fat on my steak, I don’t see why anyone would pay to add fat like that. But until something changes, things will remain the same.
Tito also said that a way to get more pounds of red meat out of our steers was to leave them as bulls and feed them out. They will put on less fat, and more red meat. Interesting.

After we got back home around 2, a group of us went to Walmart for some tie dying supplies and to Gebos for some COVERALLS! I got some coveralls for my AI class this fall and I am so excited. They are probably going to be my new favorites… what can I say? When we got back to the motel, we tie dyed!! Shay and I tie dyed Friday night and our shirts turned out awesome, so we peer pressured everyone into tie dying and it was so fun. I think we had 8 people here tie dying! After everyone had tie dyed, we ate dinner together downstairs in the break room. Dr. T went and bought steaks for everyone and one of the guys here grilled them. We had potatoes and salad, too. And of course… cheese. Gotta get that dairy in there somewhere. It was really great and so thoughtful of them to cook for us.
I’m beginning to get to know more people at the consortium and make some really great friends. I’m not going to want to leave them in a couple of weeks!

Yesterday, a couple of van loads (including me) got up super early at the crack of dawn to go to Lubbock Feed Lot. Gross huh? I hate Lubbock. The roads are crazy, and lets just face it… it’s home of the Red Raiders and I’d rather not associate with such.
The feed lot was pretty standard, I believe. Lots of heifers and steers ranging from probably 500-600 pounds to 1300 pounds. What surprised me the most was that a good bit of the cattle there were from Mexico. The man giving us the tour told us that Mexican cattle generally fed out better (and they made more return off of them). Because of the laws though, they have to keep them separate on the feed lot AND in slaughter. There were thousands of Mexican cattle branded with either an “M” or an “MX” on their right hip (MX for heifer).
Tito, our guide, also told us that with the future food shortages, the grading system for beef will probably change (and that’s a great thing for cattle producers). No longer will cattle be graded and given a premium for Prime and Choice beef, but it will be on a red meat basis. The government will want producers to make more RED MEAT on the same land area. And there are not a lot of ways this can be done.
Fact — Did you know that to produce a prime or choice steer, the last 250(ish) pounds are the MOST expensive? Do you know why? Because all that the feed is adding to the steer is fat. Usually back fat, and as we have learned in school–back fat and marbling are not very correlated. So basically feed lots are paying way too much for the last few hundred pounds of FAT. As someone who likes MINIMAL fat on my steak, I don’t see why anyone would pay to add fat like that. But until something changes, things will remain the same.
Tito also said that a way to get more pounds of red meat out of our steers was to leave them as bulls and feed them out. They will put on less fat, and more red meat. Interesting.

After we got back home around 2, a group of us went to Walmart for some tie dying supplies and to Gebos for some COVERALLS! I got some coveralls for my AI class this fall and I am so excited. They are probably going to be my new favorites… what can I say? When we got back to the motel, we tie dyed!! Shay and I tie dyed Friday night and our shirts turned out awesome, so we peer pressured everyone into tie dying and it was so fun. I think we had 8 people here tie dying! After everyone had tie dyed, we ate dinner together downstairs in the break room. Dr. T went and bought steaks for everyone and one of the guys here grilled them. We had potatoes and salad, too. And of course… cheese. Gotta get that dairy in there somewhere. It was really great and so thoughtful of them to cook for us.
I’m beginning to get to know more people at the consortium and make some really great friends. I’m not going to want to leave them in a couple of weeks!